Extractive Industries - The Management of Resources as a Driver of Sustainable Development

Published Date: 
May, 2018
Editor: 
United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER)

Edited by Tony Addison and Alan Roe

Brings together contributions from experts in the field from a wide variety of backgrounds to provide an authoritative view on each topic

Covers the economic dimensions of extractives and development, as well as their social and environmental impacts

Offers realistic recommendations to improve the extractives sector role in development

Delivers an objective and balanced steer on a variety of often contentious issues

Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives and the Media

Published Date: 
April, 2018
Editor: 
United States Agency for International Development

Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives (MSIs) are voluntary partnerships between governments, civil society, and the private sector which seek to promote good governance by holding governments and corporations accountable to citizens. Although MSIs conduct a great deal of research on transparency and good governance and have produced volumes of reports – some of which are critical of governments – they tend to be known mainly to a few stakeholders and devotees. The public is largely unfamiliar with them. Consequently, the public does not believe that MSIs have achieved much real-world impact.

Peer Pressure and Peer Learning in Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives

Published Date: 
September, 2018
Editor: 
United States Agency for International Development

This report examines three prominent Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives (MSIs) – the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) and Open Government Partnership (OGP) through the dual lenses of peer learning and peer pressure. The term “peers” implies a degree of equality between the participating parties. Peer review is defined as examinations that are systematic in their nature, of a state by another state(s), specifically designated institutions or a combination of the two. In MSIs, peer reviews are premised on mutual trust, non-confrontation,

Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives in Africa

Published Date: 
September, 2018
Editor: 
United States Agency for International Development

 – Case Studies of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), Open Government Partnership (OGP) and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) in Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Tanzania 

This report examines four African states (Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania), and their membership in three multi-stakeholder initiatives: the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), and the Open Government Partnership (OGP).

Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives: What Have We Learned?

Published Date: 
September, 2018
Editor: 
United States Agency for International Development

 An Overview and Literature Review 

This report reviews literature on three Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives (MSIs) – the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) and the Open Governance Partnership (OGP) – to provide an overview of how each MSI function and evaluate the extent to which each has impacted policy and governance issues thus far.

Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives: Lessons Learned

Published Date: 
October, 2018
Editor: 
United States Agency for International Development

Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives (MSIs) are voluntary partnerships between governments, civil society, and the private sector that have emerged over the last 15 years to address development challenges collaboratively, entrench democratic practices, and strengthen regulatory frameworks. MSIs operate on the premise that governance outcomes can be improved by increased transparency and enhanced stakeholder participation in policy reforms.

Concession Stands: How Mining Investments Incite Protest in Africa

Published Date: 
May, 2018
Editor: 
International Organization

This research contributes to the literature on natural resources and conflict. Christensen shows that the probability of a protest or riot in a locality roughly doubles where a commercial mine starts production. By contrast, he sees no effect on the likelihood of rebel activity or armed conflict.

The paper finds that the usual grievance-based explanations, such as environmental issues, in-migration, displacement, inequality and corruption, do little to predict where and when protests occur. Instead,

An analysis of the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative implementation process

Published Date: 
April, 2018
Editor: 
World Development

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) has become an international hallmark of the efforts to promote better extractive-sector management and improved societal development in natural resource-rich countries. Since its establishment in 2003, a large number of resource-dependent countries have committed to the EITI Standard, and support of the EITI from donors, nongovernmental organizations, and extractive industry companies has been vast. To understand whether and how adherence to the EITI Standard can affect resource governance and development,

The (Dis)empowering Effects of Transparency Beyond Information Disclosure: The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative in Myanmar

Published Date: 
February, 2018
Editor: 
Global Environmental Politics

This article provides theoretical and empirical insights into the effects of transparency on civil society empowerment by analyzing the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) in Myanmar. It identifies three processes through which the EITI (dis)empowers civil society: constituting, using, and debating transparency. Whereas most transparency literature focuses on the effects of information disclosure—(using transparency)–the empowering effects of constituting and debating transparency are, for the EITI in Myanmar, much greater.

The role of country-level institutional factors in escaping the natural resource curse: insights from Ghana.

Published Date: 
March, 2018
Editor: 
Resources Policy

Empirical research shows that developing countries that are rich in natural resources tend to suffer slow economic growth and development due to various factors such as quality of institutions, governance, among others. The phenomenon of slow growth is widely known as the ‘natural resource-curse’ within the energy sector literature, and past research suggests that the membership of international non-governmental organisations and transparency are key factors in supporting economic development. However,

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