The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI): The latest attempt at governing the extractive industries in Chad

Published Date: 
November, 2017
Editor: 
The Extractive Industries and Society

AbstractFor over a decade, Chad has embraced the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), one of the most widely-adopted interventions aimed at improving knowledge of revenue distribution in the mining and oil and gas sectors worldwide. In Chad, the EITI provides a foundation for dialogue between various stakeholders and has thus become an important entry point for examining the social and economic impacts of oil in the country. This paper provides an extended analysis of the EITI experience in the country,

The Rise and Limits of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Published Date: 
November, 2017
Editor: 
Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

AbstractThe rise of the transparency agenda in the extractive industries and the creation of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) are often explained as a product of global civil society activism, as a product of corporate social responsibility or as a consequence of the emergence of good governance norms and a growing awareness among policy makers of the resource curse thesis (Haufler 2010; David-Barrett and Okamura 2013; Van Alstine 2014). This chapter argues that while all these factors did play a part in promoting the transparency agenda,

Integrating a gender perspective into transparency and accountability initiatives: three case studies

Published Date: 
November, 2017
Editor: 
Gender & Development

AbstractNatural resource wealth is not shared equally by all. While elites may capture the profits disproportionately in many contexts, marginalised social groups – including women – are less likely to experience the benefits of extraction, and are affected differently by virtue of their gendered roles in the economy and society. Women also tend to be less able to participate in decision-making forums relating to extractive questions.

Pioneering extractive sector transparency. A PWYP perspective on 15 Years of EITI

Published Date: 
October, 2017
Editor: 
The Extractive Industries and Society

The EITI went from being a loose set of reporting requirements to a comprehensive and well respected standard of disclosure.PWYP played a major part in continuously strengthening the EITI as a normative trend setter in the extractive industries.Citizen uptake of EITI data remains a key challenge to delivering impact on the ground in resource rich countries.

AbstractThe EITI progressively went from being a loose set of reporting requirements to a comprehensive and well respected standard of disclosure. As a global coalition,

Enhancing citizen engagement in natural resource governance: Scope, content and input in the operation of the extractive industries transparency initiative

Published Date: 
October, 2017
Editor: 
The Extractive Industries and Society

Abstract: This opinion piece (discussion paper) examines citizen engagement in natural resource governance under the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). Building on earlier discussions of citizen engagement, it examines how the EITI can engender the interest and hence involvement of citizens in resource governance. While acknowledging the significance of reforms in the 2016 standard, this discussion seeks to provoke thought and discussion on the participation of citizens in the operation of the governance mechanism, with respect to the scope of EITI reporting,

Regulatory structures and challenges to developmental extractives - Some practical observations from Ghana

Published Date: 
October, 2017
Editor: 
United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research

Abstract: At the heart of an effective extractive resource-based economic transformation and development is an effective regulatory framework that guides the promotion of investments into the sector, the procedure for responsible extraction, and the management of the utilization of such resources. Ghana’s endowment with significant amount of ferrous and non-ferrous minerals, including gold, bauxite, manganese, diamonds, and iron ore, as well as hydrocarbons, is well known. The country has been mining gold for over a century, ranking second in production in Africa.

Public Brainpower - Civil Society and Natural Resource Management

Published Date: 
October, 2017
Editor: 
Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI)

This book examines how civil society, public debate and freedom of speech affect natural resource governance. Drawing on the theories of Robert Dahl, Jurgen Habermas and Robert Putnam, the book introduces the concept of ‘public brainpower’, proposing that good institutions require: fertile public debate involving many and varied contributors to provide a broad base for conceiving new institutions; checks and balances on existing institutions; and the continuous dynamic evolution of institutions as the needs of society change.

Improving the capacity of institutions to strengthen the management of national oil and gas resources

Published Date: 
August, 2017
Editor: 
University of Huddersfield

Abstract: Proper management of measurement activities in the oil and gas industry by the designated bodies is a challenge in most parts of the world, particularly the upstream sector of the industry. This is evident as the problem cuts across both developed (U.S.A) and the developing (Nigeria) countries. In United States, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said, “The Department of the Interior’s oil and gas production verification efforts do not provide reasonable assurance of accurate measurement of production volumes” while in Nigeria,

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and Africa's Mineral Governance Regime

Published Date: 
June, 2017
Editor: 
South African Institute of International Affairs SAIIA

The socio-economic development of African states is heavily dependent on how effectively governments are able to manage their natural resources. African states can derive greater benefit from the extraction of their natural resources and even develop sustainable legacies from their mineral wealth if the extractive industry is governed responsibly.

In particular, African states need to ensure that the revenues collected are proportionate to the true value of the resources and are distributed equitably, ie, invested in social programmes that benefit communities.

Civil Society Rights and the Extractive Industries

Published Date: 
August, 2017
Editor: 
CIVICUS

Review by CIVICUS on civil society space in countries where the EITI is being implemented. Link to report on CIVICUS page

People’s rights to organise, speak out and take action are being extensively violated in a large number of member countries of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). The CIVICUS Monitor, a new online tool to track and compare civic freedoms on a global scale, shows that the space for civil society - civic space - is currently seriously restricted in 38 of 51 EITI countries, as of May 2017. 

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