Corruption and civic space: Contextual factors influencing EITI compliance

Published Date: 
June, 2017

The article can be downloaded here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214790X16301332

Market and government failures led to the formation of multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs) as an alternative governance structure. The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is one of these. The impact assessments of EITI yield mixed results. The variation in impact may be attributed to the difference in compliance with the EITI Standard.

Evidence for a presource curse? Oil discoveries, elevated expectations, and growth disappointments

Published Date: 
June, 2017
Editor: 
World Bank

Oil discoveries can constitute a major positive and exogenous shock to economic activity, but the resource curse hypothesis would suggest they might also be detrimental to growth over the long run. This paper utilizes a new methodology for estimating growth underperformance to examine the extent to which discoveries depress the growth path of a country following a discovery and prior to production starting.

This paper is not mentioning the EITI, however it covers issues which are relevant for the EITI process.

A safer bet? Evaluating the effects of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative on mineral investment climate attractiveness

Published Date: 
December, 2016
Editor: 
The Extractive Industries and Society

The article can be downloaded here

The author contributed a blog on our website regarding these findings.

The Extractives Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is a governmental initiative focused on improving transparency and accountability within resource-rich countries. Given EITI implementation is entirely voluntary, and time and resource intensive in nature, demonstrating the benefits of implementation for participating countries is important to the initiatives long term success. Using panel data for 167 countries from 2003 to 2014,

Transparent autocracies: The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) and civil society in authoritarian states

Published Date: 
December, 2016
Editor: 
The Extractive Industries and Society

The article can be downloaded here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214790X16301307

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is a public-private partnership that aims to set a global standard in resource management. The EITI has a unique format that requires an active civil society to be part of the resource management process. At the moment, 51 resource-rich countries implement the initiative, including many non-democracies. Building up on the literatures on the resource curse, democratization, norm diffusion and compliance,

Evaluating the impact of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) on corruption in Zambia

Published Date: 
January, 2017
Editor: 
The Extractive Industries and Society

The article can be downloaded here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214790X16301344

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is internationally recognised as a leading anti-corruption scheme, which promotes transparency, accountability and good governance of public oil, gas, and mining revenues. This article provides the first rigorous quantitative investigation of the impact of EITI on corruption in Zambia. Using a case-comparison approach, called the Synthetic Control Method (SCM),

The effects of increased revenue transparency in the extractives sector: The case of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Published Date: 
March, 2017
Editor: 
The Extractive Industries and Society

The article can be downloaded here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214790X16301289

It has been argued that transparency can play an important role in allowing governments and citizens to benefit from their natural resource wealth.

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) was established in 2002 to promote transparency in the revenues collected by governments from the extractive industries, bringing industry, government and civil society stakeholders into the monitoring process.

Beneficial openness? CMI working paper

Beneficial openness? Weighing the costs and benefits of the financial transparency

Published Date: 
February, 2017
Editor: 
Chr. Michelsen Institute

Public financial transparency is increasingly advocated as a solution to concerns over legal tax planning by multinational corporations, and illegal tax evasion, fraud and money laundering. In particular there are calls for mandatory publication of beneficial ownership (the ultimate owners of companies and trusts), and country-by-country reports by multinational corporations (detailing revenues, assets, employment, profits and taxes paid in each jurisdiction). Other proposals include publication of tax rulings and profit and loss accounts for all companies.

The Swiss Commodities Trading Industry

The Swiss Commodities Trading Industry: A mapping Study

Published Date: 
March, 2017
Editor: 
IHRB

Switzerland is one of the world’s most important commodity trading hubs. The commodities trading sector is characterised by a diverse mix of companies in terms of size, ownership, turnover and commodities traded.

As the commodities trading industry grows in size, questions are increasingly being raised relating to the responsibilities of trading companies on human rights and environmental protection, and other issues such as corruption and the ‘resource curse’.

The cost of Azerbaijan’s leaving the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI): Analysis of the impact on the economy and civil society

Published Date: 
March, 2017
Editor: 
Center for Economic and Social Development

As a founding member of EITI, Azerbaijan has enjoyed the benefits of its membership in the organisation. However, the changes to NGO legislature in Azerbaijan have strained the relations between the parties, and in order to have a fully functional local NGO community, the EITI has demanded the reversal of changes to the NGO legislation in the country. Due to the lack of adequate developments in this field, according to EITI standards, the EITI Board suspended the membership of Azerbaijan. Following the decision, Azerbaijan announced its intention to leave the Initiative.

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