Financial Flows and Tax Havens: Combining to Limit the Lives of Billions of People

Published Date: 
December, 2016
Editor: 
Global Financial Integrity

Global Financial Integrity (GFI), the Centre for Applied Research at the Norwegian School of Economics and a team of global experts have released a study showing that since 1980 developing countries lost US$16.3 trillion dollars through broad leakages in the balance of payments, trade misinvoicing, and recorded financial transfers. These resources represent immense social costs that have been borne by the citizens of developing countries around the globe. Funding for the report was provided by the Research Council of Norway, and research assistance was provided by economists in Brazil,

Financial Flows and Tax Havens Combining to Limit the Lives of Billions of People

Published Date: 
December, 2015
Editor: 
Global Financial Integrity

Global Financial Integrity (GFI), the Centre for Applied Research at the Norwegian School of Economics and a team of global experts have released a study showing that since 1980 developing countries lost US$16.3 trillion dollars through broad leakages in the balance of payments, trade misinvoicing, and recorded financial transfers. These resources represent immense social costs that have been borne by the citizens of developing countries around the globe. Funding for the report was provided by the Research Council of Norway, and research assistance was provided by economists in Brazil,

High-Value Natural Resources and Transparency: Accounting for Revenues and Governance

High-Value Natural Resources and Transparency: Accounting for Revenues and Governance

Published Date: 
October, 2016
Editor: 
Oxford University Press

The increase in demand and prices of most high-value natural resources over the past five decades has resulted in massive income gains for resource-abundant countries. Paradoxically, many of these countries have suffered from slow economic growth, weak political institutions, and violent conflict. To combat corruption, increase accountability, and promote government effectiveness, the international community and advocacy groups have been promoting transparency as the remedy to misappropriation and mismanagement of revenues. Consequently, advocates, officials,

To disclose or not to disclose: How global competition for foreign direct investment influences transparency reforms in extractive industries

Published Date: 
August, 2016
Editor: 
Elsevier - Energy Policy

In the last decade, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) has grown in both popularity and influence. The ascendance of EITI is surprising because traditionally, leaders of resource-rich states prefer to tightly control their extractive industries. This paper investigates the underlying causes of EITI membership in order to understand its acceptance, even among some of the most authoritarian regimes. The paper argues that leaders of resource-rich countries use the EITI to consolidate their international prestige as eager reformers,

Scalar politics and transnational governance innovations: A political settlements lens on the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative in the Andes

Published Date: 
September, 2016
Editor: 
University of Manchester, Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre (ESID)

AbstractThe Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) originated in the international domain but can only operate if adopted at a national scale. How EITI unfolds in a particular country is thus a consequence of the particular interactions between domestic and transnational political processes, and among ideas, institutions and political interests existing at these different national and transnational scales. National politics is especially crucial to the forms taken by EITI.

Assessing the Effectiveness and Impact of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)

Published Date: 
September, 2016
Editor: 
GIZ on behalf of German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development

For more than a decade the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is implemented in resource-rich countries. Now, three years after the adoption of the EITI Standard in 2013, which includes new mandatory clauses to take steps on lessons learnt and review the outcomes and impact of EITI implementation in requirement 7, it is relevant and timely to evaluate the impact that the initiative has generated so far.

Scoping Study for EITI Data Reporting and Access Standards

Scoping Study for EITI Data Reporting and Access Standards

Published Date: 
July, 2015
Editor: 
World Bank

This scoping study was commissioned to review data formats and recommend standards and bench marks for data output required under the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) Standard.

This report has been drafted by a team led by Masuma Farooki, with contributions from Glen Jones, Peter Godwin, Tiffany Steel and Alexander Malden.

The team would like to acknowledge valuable input from Martin Lokanc, Andrew Brian Schloeffel and Sridar Padmanabhan Kannan at the World Bank and Anders Tunold Kråkenes and Sam Bartlett at the EITI Secretariat Oslo.

Corruption and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Corruption and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Published Date: 
April, 2016
Editor: 
The Journal of Development Studies

Elissaios Papyrakis, Matthias Rieger & Emma Gilberthorpe

ABSTRACT: The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) has received much attention as a scheme that can help reduce corruption in mineral-rich developing economies. To our knowledge, this paper provides the first empirical attempt (using panel data) to explore how EITI membership links to changes in corruption levels. We also examine whether the different stages in EITI implementation (initial commitment, candidature, full compliance) influence the pace of changes in corruption.

Review of International Governance and Oversight of the EITI

Revisión de la gobernanza internacional y supervisión del EITI

Published Date: 
September, 2015
Editor: 
Scanteam

Autores: Sefton Darby, Edward Bickham, Frenky Simanjuntak, Negbalee Warner

Los procesos de grupos multipartícipes son por definición creaturas ruidosas, difíciles y argumentativas. Requieren la atención constante a las relaciones, formales e informales. Están en parte definidas por la tensión que existe entre gobiernos, organizaciones de sociedad civil y compañías. El único trabajo en el que está claro el área común de los grupos para crear el marco del progreso y donde existe suficiente confianza para facilitar la cooperación. El EITI no es excepción a esto.

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